Different Ways To Have A Strong Bones:

1. EAT LOTS OF VEGETABLES :

Vegetables are great for your bones. They’re one of the best sources of vitamin C, which stimulates the production of bone-forming cells. In addition, some studies suggest that vitamin C’s antioxidant effects may protect bone cells from damage. Vegetables also seem to increase bone mineral density, also known as bone density.


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Bone density is a measurement of the amount of calcium and other minerals found in your bones. Both osteopenia (low bone mass) and osteoporosis (brittle bones) are conditions characterized by low bone density.


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2. PERFORM STRENGTH TRAINING AND WEIGH-BEARING EXERCISES :

Engaging in specific types of exercise can help you build and maintain strong bones. One of the best types of activity for bone health is weight-bearing or high-impact exercise, which promotes the formation of new bone.

Studies in children, including those with type 1 diabetes, have found that this type of activity increases the amount of bone created during the years of peak bone growth.


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3. CONSUME ENOUGH PROTEIN :

Getting enough protein is important for healthy bones. In fact, about 50% of bone is made of protein.

Researchers have reported that low protein intake decreases calcium absorption and may also affect rates of bone formation and breakdown.

However, concerns have also been raised that high-protein diets leach calcium from bones in order to counteract increased acidity in the blood.


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4. EAT HIGH-CALCIUM FOODS THROUGHOUT THE DAY :

Calcium is the most important mineral for bone health, and it’s the main mineral found in your bones.

Because old bone cells are constantly broken down and replaced by new ones, it’s important to consume calcium daily to protect bone structure and strength.

The RDI for calcium is 1,000 mg per day for most people, although teens need 1,300 mg and older women require 1,200 mg.


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5. GET PLENTY OF VITAMIN D AND VITAMIN K :

Vitamin D and vitamin K are extremely important for building strong bones.

Vitamin D plays several roles in bone health, including helping your body absorb calcium. Achieving a blood level of at least 30 ng/ml (75 nmol/l) is recommended for protecting against osteopenia, osteoporosis and other bone diseases.

Indeed, studies have shown that children and adults with low vitamin D levels tend to have lower bone density and are more at risk for bone loss than people who get enough.


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6. AVOID VERY LOW-CALORIE DIETS :

Dropping calories too low is never a good idea. In addition to slowing down your metabolism, creating rebound hunger and causing muscle mass loss, it can also be harmful to bone health.

Studies have shown that diets providing fewer than 1,000 calories per day can lead to lower bone density in normal-weight, overweight or obese individuals.


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In one study, obese women who consumed 925 calories per day for four months experienced a significant loss of bone density from their hip and upper thigh region, regardless of whether they performed resistance training.

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